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20130115
20130123
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Book TV 28
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CSPAN2 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 12:30pm EST
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 12:30am EST
that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separate father's determi
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:00pm EST
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:00am EST
a lot of dreams. he was hard working, and he taught us to value education. he taught us that here in this country we wouldn't go far if we didn't have an education so he taught me to dream a lot of dreams that i don't know if i would have dreamed op my own. i'm grateful to my father for, you know, encouraging me to dream big, and he would always say, you know, just because we're undocumented tennessee doesn't mean that we cannot dream. >> host: so what's your relationship with your mother? what was your relationship? >> well, my mother, she was, you know, very good mother up until the point when she took off to come here to the u.s.. when she came here here, her experienced changed her a lot. she did not have a good experience in the u.s.. my father left her for another woman, and when she came back to mexico, she was very bitter and broken hearted about the whole experience, and she changed, too, as a mother. she was no longer interested in being our mother. she was more interested in finding someone to heal her broken heart. i lost my mother when she came here because the woman
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:15am EST
mistresses in shaping the man. i suspect a lot of my colleagues tend to be older man, educated in a certainly they didn't do any such matters manchester is that they are not dedicated under educated matters of the heart. by studying the first lady, for example the first and thomas jefferson did, after spending 13 days and it lost outside of philadelphia bred in the declaration of independence, he went shopping for his wife. he mr. she was preggers. she had a miscarriage and game mastering batterson gloves. then he begged off from serving the rest of the summer so he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there besides george washington, suffering through the freezing weather was martha washington with her white on at cannes. so we get new insight on the price and the new insight than others needs. by proposing that book washington's closest adviser with alexander hamilton one of the chapters in the book talks about hamilton's history of womanizing. for example, bill clinton was not the first were the worst when it comes to this behavior i
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
. it was in a book about teaching kids how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject with him i don't run into. so that's where the format is an illustrated picture book for kids. as i got into the subject and started looking into train, which is relevant to some children's lives. their children but pickett, families involved in the oppressive policies to eradicate coca and it's a social or cultural issue. as i got deeper into the history of coca and specifically with relationships of the coca-cola company, origins from a medical marvel to the drug problem we have today, it got really complicated and so now it's a book for adults. i also started in coca with coffee because they wanted to do a comparison is not in that fascinated me with the way the drugs, plants change their perceptions over time for the cultural perceptions, the legal, social perceptions. as inspired by michael collins spoke about body of desire, where he talks about the history for different plants. when apples came to this country, they want the fleshy fruit
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00pm EST
on the vanguard and organizing against good business. they wanted to go back to the farm and have an educated population that would have some political power. now, i am not suggesting that this is a conspiracy by any means. this is simply people, the surplus that they operated in. what they perceived as self-interest. it is something that they probably thought were the best thing for the country. these men represented this interest and for the most part, they view the world through an urban lens. some of them grew up on a farm. replacing small farms with integrated ones that could supply the food companies with the raw ingredients that they needed. so the cdc lobbied against the new deal farm programs and they began to really successfully start chipping away at them in the 1950s during the eisenhower administration. in 1962, the cd published a report that was prepared by 50 influential business leaders and 18 economists from leading universities. it was called an adaptive program for agriculture, and it laid out his plan to drastically reduce the number of farmers and to create this large lab
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:45pm EST
with the billions of dollars we invest in the prison infrastructure. that gets transferred into education and then people make wise decisions. like you said, there is access to these dirty, cheap, bad drugs. people were able to get access to much more benign drugs like marijuana they might make decisions that if they had the education to know, this is actually help your choice. we might not ever get rid of drugs completely, but there are six alternatives to the worse options. >> one last question over here in the quarter for the evening and then we will have to wrap up this portion and move on to the book signing. so last question for the evening. i want to thank you. a very good presentation. i think he presented a very good case. the coca leaf is innocuous or even beneficial. however, it is true, you get cocaine from coca. cocaine is quite a, well, it is a substance for you can make a lot of money. you have the drug cartels involved in that. how can you control the growth of coca without getting the drug cartels involved and keeping it from being processed into the cocaine that can be o
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
that august educational institute not too far from here, i mean bard college, there's actually an alger hiss chair inhumanities. my colleague, hilton kramer, the founding editor, had an honorary degree from bard when this new chair inhumanities was pronounced. he probably gave it back to the president. well, i'm delighted to welcome you to our final panel commemorating the 60th anniversary of whittaker chambers "witness." and i think we saved the most difficult or at least the most contentious question for last. what defines conservatives tod today? i think in the context of "witness" and the work of bill buckley, today means after the cold war. he said a little bit about that already this afternoon. but i'd like to say a little more about it, little more succinct way about it now. so after the cold war, that means after the implacable confrontation of communism by the evil empire, the soviet union and the west. in his preparatory letter to his children are which has been mentioned already, chambers said that in communism he saw quote the concentrated evil of our time. bill buckley looked wi
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 3:00pm EST
of these soldiers coming back from world war ii going back to the farm and having an educated population, um, that would have some political power. now, i am not suggesting that this is a conspiracy by any means. this was simply people of like mind in their social clubs and in their, the circles that today operated in -- that they operated in acting in what they perceived as their self-interest. and, you know, for some of them probably they thought this was the best thing for the country. these men represented really disparate interests and, for the most part, they were technocrats. they viewed the world through this urban lens. some of them had grown up on farms, didn't think much of the idea. their definition of reforming agriculture meant substituting capital for farm labor and replacing small farms with large, vertically-integrated ones that could supply the food companies with the raw ingredients that they needed. so the ced and the business interests that they represented lobbied against the new deal farm programs, and they began to really successfully start chipping away at them in th
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 4:00pm EST
of education, has generally been supportive of these value added numbers, after the data was published, the obama administration has provided financial incentives for states to provide value add educators for paying and promoting teachers. proopinion anyones point out they're a huge potential improvement over systems in which all teaches are paid in a system -- many experts warn these assessments have large margins of error and can deliver misleading results. the union representing the new york city teachers spent more than $100,000 on a up in advertising campaign, built around the headline, this is no way to rate a teacher. opponents argue the value added assessment creates a false impression used by parents and public officials who do not understand the limitations of of this. everybody is right up to a point. a man works extensively with value added data for teachers, warns that these are inharen day noisy. the results are based on a single test, taken on a single day, by a single group of students. all kinds of factors can lead to random fluctuations, anything from a particularly d
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2013 7:00am EST
young people make it through, um, you know, their educational goals, college or graduate school, in light of runaway tuition. >> yes. >> is that right? okay. do you want -- >> and also -- [inaudible] >> right. >> i mean, how are we going to get the doctors if tuition is 70 grand a year? >> we write in the booking about how -- in the book about how hard it is for homeless kids in the cities in which they live today just get through high school. the challenge that so many kids confront, and liz murray wrote, you know, a beautiful memoir, "breaking night," about her journey from homelessness to harvard, how are we going to create opportunities for kids whose families won't or can't take care of them who have been told over and over again you're broken because they're poor or their parents hate them or reject them because they're gay or lesbian. these kids feel so damaged that college feels like another planet to them. and we write in the book about the game changing things that cities and nonprofits are doing to create high schools that are connected to homeless youth centers. ther
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 2:05pm EST
of the first lady as the largely ignored the mistresses and shipping the man. tend to be older man, educated in a certain way. most historians, as i always say, were not educated in matters of the heart. studying the first lady, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in of lost outside a philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did is he went shopping for market, his wife. he mr. she was pregnant. she had had a miscarriage. he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war. suffering through the freezing weather at valley forge was martha washington right there. so by studying the first lady's we get new insights on the presidents and new insights on other things. apropos to my book washington's closest adviser was alexander hamilton. one of the chapters in the book talks about hamiltons history of womanizing. for example not the first. there is a long long history of the. elliott spencer, arnold schwarzenegger, john
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 5:00pm EST
. this is the country joins. what training programs exist to educate judges about precedence over national law? is very national mechanism to promote de facto equality? if so, does it promote measures in developing policies? chemical professionals initiate lawsuits? if so, how many cases have been filed? at their quotas, targets or goals? if so, what are they? does the machinery attacked budget expenditures? for% is spent on women's programs, social issues, family programs? or their quotas, targets, specifics? et cetera, et cetera. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of ca
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 7:30pm EST
and it would be a tragedy if this country moved in a direction to make education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> host: amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom at the university? >> guest: i enjoy teaching and take every opportunity to meet with students, talk to students and teacher my spare time. >> host: what does a provost do and how library at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years of the time i got my phd to the time i came to pan and was dean of the faculty at princeton and the chief academic and financial officer at princeton or the progress works closely with the president. >> host: with the learning curve on being president of the university? >> guest: well, the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. >> host: gives a primer. just go the university of pennsylvania had 10,000 undergraduates and 10 dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we ran three hospitals and we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15pm EST
that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education. the sputnik launch in 1957. it may been to a younger generation to defuse because sputnik is probably not as -- as it is to the older generation but i was pretty clever. most of his slogans were not really caught on. the first summer he was in wishing to and he said, and it's a strange construct but he said in august this is the time when the shinki and becomes more -- and nobody knows what it means. somehow it's applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions that you want to talk about. yes, sir m.? >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the president's that we popularly think are so eloquent john f. kennedy. where they just good at regular words? >> john f. kennedy had some wonderful phrases and new frontier was his. but they were eloquent in their sensibility and the speeches. it wasn't that they created a term that was everlasting and some of them have interesting -- you would go to new frontier and go to term and. truman had costs are. he brought that bac
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:45am EST
hundred mayors, one of the time proved it greater design education than anything it done before or since. i specialize in downtown someone higher to make a downtown plan elect to move there with my family, preferably for a month. many recent symmetry city by you plan. more efficient in terms of travel and meetings, some in very expensive. second allows you to get to know a place to get to know every building from the street and block. is your chance to get familiar with locals over coffee connectedness in people's homes, drinks a neighborhood pubs and chance encounters on the street. these non-meeting meetings are where most of the intelligent gets collected. these are all great reasons, but the main reason to spend time in the cities to live the life of a citizen shuttling between hotel and meeting facility is not what citizens do. they take kids to school, make their way to work on a stick for lunch, hit the gym or pick up groceries, get themselves home and considered evening stroll or after your. friends are not a contract anemone can get taken out for them in the main square. these a
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 10:15am EST
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 3:00pm EST
regenerate our interest research and development and education. it may have been too an younger generation. but most of the slogans had not really caught on. the first summer he's in washington, he said it is a strange concept, but in august, this is the time when washington becomes hard to get done. nobody knows what that means but it somehow applicable. does anyone have any questions? yes ma'am. >> i'm surprised you didn't mention the popular ones that we think of. were some presidents just that regular words? >> truman had some nice thihad . each one was kind of different. truman had -- they all have stories. we say a truman-ism is where he was having a lot of trouble with congress. and he brought up the word trocar, which is an instrument used to relieve pressure in organic places. in the perry in missouri, when a bowler cal -- a cow or a full would ingest too much error, they would ingest this trocar and it would create a whistling sound and he said that it was a trocar with congress. [laughter] he carve it in a piece of wood and hung it above his desk. there is eloquence. i really di
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:00pm EST
, they captured all men in the pillbox. remarkably a lieutenant was educated in the united states and he said basically i am ready to surrender. lieutenant edlund said to him to the commander of the fort -- take me to the commander of the fort and that is what he did. with his tiny gun and a fabulous four when trudy locris battery, down an elevator, through an amphitheater that looked like a football field and they went into the depths of this guns and -- guns of navarrone type situation and went to the commanding officer's office. edlund decided to break through the board. at that point of the commanding officer looked at him and said what do you want? he said we would like you to surrender the fort. the commanding officer was incredulous. you are only four men. he picked up the steel telephone. you are my prisoner. at that point robert edlund proudly had one of the greatest moves of world war ii. he pulled out a hand grenade and put it between his legs and said you are going to surrender the locris battery. 800 men from the locris battery surrendered after he broadcast that over the loudspe
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 1:25pm EST
of education decision in 1954. strom thurmond is the record holder to this day of the longest one-man filibuster. at it in the guinness book of record wards, 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against then 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond as one know last of the jim crow demagogues. but what we forget about thurmond, he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what die mean by -- what do i mean? the sun belt -- it's one of the major stories in the history of 20 until century american politics, and that is the flow of jobs, of industries, of resources and populations, from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and southwest,, in the post world wr ii period. southern states were recruiting industries, passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so, states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona, north carolina, a
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 8:30pm EST
, started megachurches, educational institutions and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverly lehay who is a particular interest of mine in this book founded a group called conservative women for america which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states, and she based her organization on five spiritual principles; the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life. and she began to litigate arguing that religious parents should have more control, for example, over what their children were taught in school, arguing that, um, the era, the equal rights amendment for women, was a violation of the fundamental order of things and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for your book? >> guest: i did not. she actually lives in seclusion now. she's very -- she retired about almost 15 years ago now and lives, um, in california again. >> host: somebody you would have liked to have talked to? >> guest: i would very much like to talk to her. and one of the things that i think is really important is t
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00pm EST
and how they keep that oil -- getting makerbot is educational and how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. you can play me. >> host: where did you come up with the idea of? >> guest: 3-d printers have been around for 25 years but they were mainframe sized machines that were really expensive. i wanted one that i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together and we started tinkering. when it worked we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot in the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn new york one of the hottest products here on the floor of ces. you have been watching "the communicators" on c-span
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:30am EST
the cool ant goes and how they keep that separate from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me. [laughter] where did you come up with the idea? >> guest: you know, 3-d printers have been around for about 25 years, but they were mainframe-size machines that were really expensive. i wanted one. but i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together, and we started tinkering. and when it worked, we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn, new york, one of the ottest products on -- hottest products here on the floor of ces. [inaudible conversations] >> host: and you've been watching "the communicators" on c-span from las vegas and ces international 2013, the technology show. we will be back next week with more programming from this con convention. >> david maraniss began researching and writing his tenth b
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 6:00pm EST
and going to ask if the secession could have been prevented. he is talking about the military education, the acceptance that has to go down but he feels uneasy about the constitution and some of the causes and he's already beginning to look at the session the and he certainly is in january before and he says in his letter not a moral point of view but the implication of savages from africa making slaves of them would be the best we could do for them but the question as political bearings virginia and north carolina from the sleeves of the market and the value of the property of the confederacy were such importations prohibited would be more than it would be in the southern confederacy which would admit of no such competition and we already have the plotting for the secession before he's there. estimate i don't think the secession could ever have been actually. estimate your absolutely right it's not going to change what we agree on and that is they would not have accepted anyone but a proslavery democrat at that moment. they didn't even accept the popular democrat. stephen douglass to s
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 2:00pm EST
, well-educated, has his wife, coretta, and for children caught the young guest who were quite young, the youngest boreman 63, born in birmingham. so dexter irca the youngest is just an infant during this period. this is a period when dr. king is most political, in the sense that in the early your workout in the parting of the waters come he's getting drawn into other people's movements because he's an orator, and he would go help out. the bus boycott wasn't his idea. the freedom rides and the sit-ins certainly weren't his idea to give he would get called in to these meetings. but by 1963 where we start here, he's right and that the south is hardened against segregation and that the moment in history might fit without implementing something into history that will resist that recession, that retrograde trend. and he takes a huge risk to the he says i'm going to have my own movement. i'm going to risk everything. first in birmingham to try to crack segregation and then later in selma, where we ending 65, after the long year of 64 where he is lobbying and submitting to jail when st. aug
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 9:00am EST
has her or ph.d. in special education, but she's a traditional disciplinarian, tough love. so they contact the nun, and the nun is kind enough to come over to their house in exchange for a small donation for the church, and sits down. she wants to sit down with the kids one at a time. so she sits down with kid number one, the 10-year-old. and she's got her steel ruler in her hand, and she says ever so gently just the simplest question she can think of. son, where is god? and the little boy sits there and doesn't say a word. so she gets a little less patient, and she says a little more sternly, son, where is god? and the little kid still doesn't answer. so she taps her palm with the steel ruler and comes out with that kind of controlled fury that has taken command of kids from the south bronx to compton, california, and she says, son, i'm asking you, where is god? and the kid runs away and hides in a closet. now, his little brother knows this is the closet where they usually plan strange things like the next garage to burn and comes into the closet to see what's going on. and t
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:30pm EST
and the second act of the book is largely chicago with his education in california, new york and boston thrown in some but largely chicago and that is when he recreate himself as a political been, so when you think about it we are all sort of created from a lot of different strengths but i can't think of anybody with a more fascinating mix them obama. >> host: tell us about the team here. >> i can't tell you how happy i am about the people in working with. i don't know swahili which is the mother tongue of this part of kenya and most people speak english, they all don't and the drive on the other side of the road and i would have been dead if i tried to drive myself plus there are no road signs. the places we've, i couldn't find in a million years and i'm pretty good at finding things, so i definitely needed a great driver and we got one. he is a friend and interested in politics. i needed somebody on the ground to help set up interviews and the national archives and elsewhere. i looked out and got ken who is 40-years-old, investigative journalist and kenya, very tough, straightforward, smart,
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28